Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 BugGuide Gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#69358
Large Bee: Bumble, or Have I Bungled It? - Bombus crotchii - male

Large Bee: Bumble, or Have I Bungled It? - Bombus crotchii - Male
Riley Wilderness Park, Coto De Caza, Orange County, California, USA
August 7, 2006
I've been going crosseyed over bee mimics so long that I don't recognize the real thing. (Thought this was a robber fly at first.) Duh! Critter was fairly inert, but didn't want me getting very close.

Images of this individual: tag all
Large Bee: Bumble, or Have I Bungled It? - Bombus crotchii - male Large Bee: Bumble, or Have I Bungled It? - Bombus crotchii - male

Moved
Moved from Bumble Bees.

Editor: New Guide page needed
Bombus crotchii Cresson; see below.

Bombus (Crotchiibombus) crotchii Cresson, 1878
male; B. auricomus is only found in eastern N. America! Its similarly enlarged eyes are convergent, not homologous

 
John, thanks so much!
It's wonderful to get a more detailed ID. Quite a pleasant surprise!

Bombus nevadensis auricomus (Apidae)
Probably. Check here.

I would say it is a "real" Bu
I would say it is a "real" Bumbelbee, genus Bombus, but it is a male. There are some species which have the large eyed males, but I'm only familiar with the European fauna...

 
Thanks, Martin
I went through the guide but couldn't see a match. Your help and knowledge are always appreciated.

Unless I'm Mistaken...
Those long antennae can only mean Apidae>Eucerini

Update: so, maybe I am mistaken...

 
Interesting stuff, Chuck.
I think I have one of those diggers, but elsewhere. Nice looking insect. (I like 'em hairy.)

 
I agree with Martin.
This does appear to be a male Bombus. Note the 'flattened' hind leg segments, which are much more characteristic of Bombus than other genera in the Apidae.

 
Bombus it is
I've moved it there.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.