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Species Glyphipterix bifasciata - Hodges#2339

Glyphipterix bifasciata ? - Glyphipterix bifasciata For Oregon, June - Glyphipterix bifasciata Micromoth sp. - Glyphipterix bifasciata Glyphipterix bifasciata  - Glyphipterix bifasciata Glyphipterix bifasciata Glyphipterix bifasciata Glyphipterix bifasciata
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Yponomeutoidea (Ermine Moths and kin)
Family Glyphipterigidae (Sedge and False Diamondback Moths)
Subfamily Glyphipteriginae (Sedge Moths)
Genus Glyphipterix
Species bifasciata (Glyphipterix bifasciata - Hodges#2339 )
Hodges Number
2339
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Glyphipterix bifasciata Walsingham, 1881 (1)
Phylogenetic sequence #360099
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet from Latin meaning "two-banded" for the "two white fasciae" on the wings. (1)
Size
Forewing length 5-8 mm.(2)
Identification
Forewing basal half has two white bands fully crossing the wing and three white subapical chevron shaped patches at the coastal margin. (distinctive)(2)

Large photo of pinned adult at University of California, Berkeley
Range
Widespread along the Pacific Coast of California to southern Alaska with some records from the Great Basin. (3)
Habitat
Chaparral and wooded canyons. (2)
Season
Adults usually fly from June to July but have been collected as late as September.(2)
Food
Larval host unknown. (2)
Remarks
Diurnal but adults have been collected at blacklights.(2)
Print References
Powell, J.A., and P.A. Opler 2009. Moths of Western North America. pl. 11.31, p. 108.(2)
Heppner, J.B. 1985. Sedge Moths of North America, the (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae)(3)
Walsingham, T. de Grey. 1881. On some North-American Tineidae. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1881: 321; Pl.36, f.12. (1)
Works Cited
1.On some North-American Tineidae.
Lord Walsingham. 1881. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1881: 301-324, Pl.35,36.
2.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
3.The Sedge Moths of North America (Lepidoptera: Glyphipterigidae)
John B. Heppner. 1985. CRC Press.