Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#695775
A CAS specimen of Rhipiphorus vierecki - Ripiphorus - female

A CAS specimen of Rhipiphorus vierecki - Ripiphorus - Female
Globe, Gila County, Arizona, USA
May 20, 1933
This 2nd image gives a slightly different angle of view, which will hopefully be helpful in discerning the "coxal projections", mentioned below.

Again, the red arrows point to two relatively large, downward-pointing, conical projections at the inner bases of the forelegs. (They are somewhat dark and difficult to make out.) I'm interpreting these as the "densely hairy elongate projections on the inner side of the front coxae at apex" mentioned in reference to R. rex as a "significant character of the species" on pg. 17 of Vaurie(1). Note that the beetle's right palp is partially blocking the view of the conical projection at the inner base of its left foreleg. All this may be difficult to see in the 560 x 420 pixel image above, but will be more discernible in the full-size 2907 x 2178 pixel image here.

The green arrow points to what looks to me like a small suture-separated leg part at the base of the femur, which I'm speculating may be the (smallish) trochanter here. And, again, the two much larger dark-brown triangular-to-conical objects (between the green arrow and the bottom of the head) I'm taking as the elongated coxae. This is my best attempt at interpreting the anatomical homologies here. I'd very much appreciate correction or confirmation here, from those who may know for sure!

Images of this individual: tag all
A CAS specimen of Rhipiphorus vierecki - Ripiphorus - female A CAS specimen of Rhipiphorus vierecki - Ripiphorus - female A CAS specimen of Rhipiphorus vierecki - Ripiphorus - female

Moved

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.