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Photo#70057
Creepy-Crawly from Hell - Giant Desert Centipede - Scolopendra heros - Scolopendra heros

Creepy-Crawly from Hell - Giant Desert Centipede - Scolopendra heros - Scolopendra heros
Kerrville, Kerr County, Texas, USA
August 10, 2006
Size: 160 mm (!)

Centipede bite
Centipede bites definitely don't kill people. They are less dangerous compare to some poisonous spiders. It might cause severe pain, swelling and redness, swollen, headache, nausea and vomiting. If bite become infected it should be treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. From getting rid of.

Scolopendra heros
Another color variant of S. heros Girard, 1853, the largest-bodied centipede in North America, growing up to 7 inches or so. It ranges from Kansas & southern Missouri to Louisiana, and westward through Texas & New Mexico/eastern Colorado to the Colorado River in Arizona. It ranges southward about 1/4 of the way into Mexico, and has not been authentically found west of the Colorado River in California.

Wow!
Looks like a good match for this one in the guide. I don't know if there are any similar species.


 
Scolopendra heros castaneiceps
I concur with Hannah. This centipede is common throughout the midwest and we see them a lot in Oklahoma. From being a myriapod fan, I know there is a Chinese species that is very similar in coloration and size. I don't know about venom toxicity, however. The centipedes in the U.S. may look scary and fast but they don't kill people.

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