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Species Syngrapha abstrusa - Hodges#8940

Moth - Syngrapha abstrusa 831 Syngrapha abstrusa - Abstruse Looper Moth 8940 - Syngrapha abstrusa - female No moth, 12:51pm - Syngrapha abstrusa Syngrapha abstrusa Syngrapha abstrusa Syngrapha abstrusa Syngrapha abstrusa - Hodges#8940 - Syngrapha abstrusa - male Syngrapha abstrusa - Hodges#8940 - Syngrapha abstrusa - male
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Noctuoidea (Owlet Moths and kin)
Family Noctuidae (Owlet Moths)
Subfamily Plusiinae (Looper Moths)
Tribe Plusiini
Subtribe Plusiina
Genus Syngrapha
Species abstrusa (Syngrapha abstrusa - Hodges#8940)
Hodges Number
8940
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Syngrapha abstrusa Eichlin & Cunningham, 1978
Phylogenetic sequence # 931224 (1)
Size
Eichlin & Cunningham (1978) listed the forewing length 13-15 mm. (2)
Identification
Syngrapha abstrusa, alias, cryptica and rectangula cannot be reliably separated using DNA barcoding, PLoS ONE 12(6): e0178548; Supplementary Table S8 (3). Examiantion of genitalia is usually required.
"... In general, abstrusa is a little smaller than alias, the central silver spots usually are separated, the pattern seems more reticulated than in alias and the pale areas have a slight violet tint, whereas alias averages larger, the silver spots usually are fused, and often there is a brownish patch in the medial area just beyond and below the silver patch. The male genitalia are different and the differences can often be seen without dissection if the two valves are a little protruding, or separated slightly, so you can brush away the scales and look between the valves. The long clasper almost reached the dorsal margin of the valve, whereas in alias it is hard to find because if your brushing the tails because it's so small. Also the end of the valve is more foot-shaped with a tiny "neck" so it often breaks when you brush the tails, unlike in abstrusa." - C. Schmidt & D. Lafonataine (pers. comm., 03/5/2018)

Range
Eichlin & Cunningham (1978) reported Ontario, Maine, New Hampshire, Michigan, and Wisconsin. (2)
E.H. Strickland Museum reportes south through the Rockies to northern New Mexico. In the east south to New Jersey and Ohio.
Habitat
E.H. Strickland Museum reports dry coniferous forests.
Food
E.H. Strickland Museum states the larvae have been reared on Englemann spruce (Picea englemanni), White spruce (Picea glauca) and Jack pine (Pinus banksiana). Adults nectar at fireweed.
See Also
* abstrusa (June) usually on the wing earlier than alias (July-August) and generally found in drier environments (E.H. Strickland Museum).
Print References
Eichlin, T.D. & H.B. Cunningham 1978. The Plusiinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) of America north of Mexico, emphasizing genitalic and larval morphology. USDA Tech. Bulletin 1567: 1-122. (2)
Lafontaine, J.D. & R.W. Poole 1991. The Moths of America North of Mexico, Fascicle 25.1. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation. p. 114; plate 3, figs. 31-33. (4)
Zahiri R., J.D. Lafontaine, B.C. Schmidt, J.R. deWaard, E.V. Zakharov, P.D.N. Hebert, 2017. Probing planetary biodiversity with DNA barcodes: The Noctuoidea of North America. PLoS ONE, 12(6): e0178548.
Works Cited
1.Annotated check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico.
Donald J. Lafontaine, B. Christian Schmidt. 2010. ZooKeys 40: 1–239 .
2.The Plusiinae (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) of America north of Mexico, emphasizing genitalic and larval morphology
Thomas D. Eichlin, Hugh B. Cunningham. 1978. United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin 1567: 1-121.
3.Probing planetary biodiversity with DNA barcodes: The Noctuoidea of North America.
Zahiri R., J.D. Lafontaine, B.C. Schmidt, J.R. deWaard, E.V. Zakharov, P.D.N. Hebert. 2017. PLoS ONE 12 (6): e0178548.
4.The Moths of America North of Mexico. Fascicle 25.1. Noctuoidea, Noctuidae (part), Plusiinae
J. Donald Lafontaine, Robert W. Poole. 1991. The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation.
5.Pacific Northwest Moths
6.North American Moth Photographers Group
7.BOLD: The Barcode of Life Data Systems