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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#708880
Callobius - Callobius pictus - male

Callobius - Callobius pictus - Male
Cowichan Valley, British Columbia, Canada
September 27, 2012
Size: ~10mm body length
Found behind the bark of a fir stump just outside the yard. Callobius pictus? I've been finding females for a while now.

Images of this individual: tag all
Callobius - Callobius pictus - male Callobius - Callobius pictus - male Callobius - Callobius pictus - male Callobius - Callobius pictus - male Callobius - Callobius pictus - male Callobius - Callobius pictus - male Callobius - Callobius pictus - male

ID confirmed by Rod Crawford.
Moved from Spiders.

Steve Lew's photo...
Follow-up...

What do you all think of this palp...
retrolateral view

That doesn't look much like Robin's drawings of C. pictus, if you ask me... (C. severus would be my first guess...)

 
...
The tibia certainly looks like what I've gotten from C. severus before, though I have no diagrams to compare with.

My hunch, too: pictus...
Yeah, C. pictus was going to be my guess. It's a bit difficult with your images -- to compare with Leech one needs a true dorsal view of the left palpal tibia (more or less as if you took the palp in the last image and rotated it on its long axis another 90 degrees clockwise (from above), so that we could see what an observer off to the right is now seeing.

That and a straight-on full view of the medial apophysis (visible in your first palp image) are what Robin illustrates.

Now we'll see if Rod thinks we're on target...

 
Dorsal tibia view
Just added another image. Is it the right angle? Fortunately I kept the little guy overnight. Wish I could get away with this sort of angle on all spiders! He was much more cooperative than he was with the other palp shots.

 
Almost
Almost. On the distal margin of the patella dorsally there is a small "peak" that is slightly darker and more sclerotized. You can see it in your newest image -- Leech calls it the "articulation point at the bottom of the tibia".

That point should be center in the dorsal view; this gives you more or less a straight-on view of the dorsal process (center), with the ectal process visible to the left and the medal process right(for left palp).

I still think we're right about the species, but just the slightest bit of rotation can make a close comparison much more difficult.

-Kevin

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