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Photo#714356
Some More Unusual Behaviour By Unknown Ants - Brachymyrmex depilis - female

Some More Unusual Behaviour By Unknown Ants - Brachymyrmex depilis - Female
Montrose, Laurens County, Georgia, USA
July 2, 2012
Size: unknown
Found on back porch late at night. These came breezing in with a number of others and most tended to bump into others and pull away quickly. These two seemed attracted to one another, slowly circling around and meeting with much touching and keeping their jaws tightly pressed to each other. After a minute, they separated and wandered off. I am unable to match these to a particular species, so far.....

Images of this individual: tag all
Some More Unusual Behaviour By Unknown Ants - Brachymyrmex depilis - female Some More Unusual Behaviour By Unknown Ants - Brachymyrmex depilis - female Some More Unusual Behaviour By Unknown Ants - Brachymyrmex depilis - female Some More Unusual Behaviour By Unknown Ants - Brachymyrmex depilis - female

Added later. Some recent corr
Added later. Some recent correspondence amoong my anty friends indicates this is probably a new species, but we'll leave it here till that is formalized.

Moved
Nice pictures! Nine-segmented antennae clinch the genus; pale color, the species.

The behavior is not at all unusual among ants that recognize one another. Possibly, these two flew from the same parent colony. It is also true, however, that queens that have flown will team up with others they encounter to establish a new colony. In some cases, only one survives after the workers appear, others continue to coexist in a multiple-queen colony.

 
Talk about learning
something new every day...I wasn't aware that queens would acknowledge each other once on the wing. Thanks, James!

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