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Photo#715114
Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female

Jumper - Phanias albeolus - Female
Cowichan Valley, British Columbia, Canada
October 16, 2012
Size: ~6-7mm body length
Found this neat little jumper on some plywood in the yard. Phanias albeolus perhaps?

I just realized I photographed one of these around this time last year. Always wondered what it was.

Images of this individual: tag all
Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female Jumper - Phanias albeolus - female

ID confirmed by Rod Crawford
"Your Phanias epigynum is again verging on the overexposed, you can see the spermathecae great but the edges of the copulatory openings are just about washed out. However, after some manipulation it does look like albeolus, plus the body color/scaling is pretty distinctive."

Moved from Jumping Spiders.

Seems like a good possibility
P. albeolus seems like a good possibility, from what I can see; your specimen matches Chamberlin & Ivie's description quite well; P. watonus appears to have a different epigynum and habitus appearance. And P. albeolus also appears on Robb's BC species list.

 
...
Lynette found the closest thing I could find habitus-wise:


It seems there's a lot of variation in the species, though. Check this out, also P. albeolus!


I've emailed Rod for confirmation.

 
P. albeolus
looks right to me too, but it's best to wait for Rod's comments.

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