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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#716247
Crabonidae near beach - Crabro

Crabonidae near beach - Crabro
Moss Beach, San Mateo County, California, USA
August 12, 2012
A number of these were perched motionless and well-spaced on this weathered log in a verdant gulch with a small running brook, less than 100 ft from a fairly pristine beach on the Pacific. They would fly off when I approached, but promptly returned if I moved a small distance away. From their behavior, I'm guessing they were males waiting at a favored site for finding females.

I believe these are in the subtribe Crabronina, perhaps the genus Ectemnius, from the close resemblance to the posts below:



I read in Bohart & Menke (1) that Ectemnius burrows are often made in decaying wood of logs or stumps; that many species are multivoltine and re-use old nests in logs; and that they feed on various Diptera...which were plentiful in the short steep gulch, along the brook, and on the seaweed wrack on the nearby beach.

Images of this individual: tag all
Crabonidae near beach - Crabro Crabonidae near beach - Crabro Crabonidae near beach - Crabro Crabonidae near beach - Crabro Crabonidae near beach - Crabro

These must be Females.
I think male Crabro species have very expanded tibiae on their forelimbs. See Eric Eaton's comment on the info tab.

 
Shields
This is true for most species, except those in the Crabro hilaris species group, which have simple fore tibiae. I have updated the info page. Nonetheless, I agree that these are females (the one on the right side and the close-ups for sure).

 
GTK
I should know there will always be an exception!

Moved
Moved from Crabronina.

 
Thanks Matthias
...for ID to genus.

Moved

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