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Species Eristalis tenax - Drone Fly

Syrphidae 9.02.09 01 - Eristalis tenax Syrphid Fly - Eristalis tenax - female Eristalis tenax ? - Eristalis tenax - female Fly sp - Eristalis tenax Drone Fly (Eristalis tenax) - Eristalis tenax flower fly species - Eristalis tenax - female Having trouble with an Eristalis - Eristalis tenax - female Drone fly Eristalis sp? - Eristalis tenax
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon ("Aschiza")
Family Syrphidae (Hover Flies)
Subfamily Eristalinae
Tribe Eristalini
Subtribe Eristalina
Genus Eristalis
No Taxon (Subgenus Eristalis)
Species tenax (Drone Fly)
Explanation of Names
Eristalis (Eristalis) tenax (Linnaeus 1758)
Size
13-15 mm(1)
Identification
looks much like a honeybee (Apis mellifera).
Two vertical bands of hairs on the eyes
Range
of Eurasian origin, now cosmopolitan (incl. most of NA: LB-AK nto FL-CA)
Habitat
larvae in small ponds, ditches, drains
Season
late Mar to early Dec, most common in Sep-Oct(1)
Food
Adults feed on nectar, larvae feed on rotting organic material in stagnant water
Life Cycle
larva breathes through the long thin tube that extends from its rear end to water surface (thus its common name, 'rat-tailed maggot')
Remarks
Introduced in North America prior to 1874