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Photo#72360
Psorthaspis - Psorthaspis sanguinea

Psorthaspis - Psorthaspis sanguinea
fayetteville, washington County, Arkansas, USA
August 22, 2006
Size: ~20mm
just thought i would add a couple more pictures... i think this is the same individual as before. i followed her around for about two hours this evening, but no spider to speak of... i am trying.

Images of this individual: tag all
Psorthaspis - Psorthaspis sanguinea Psorthaspis - Psorthaspis sanguinea

Yes...
beautiful shots anyway. I know the pain of chasing around a female spider wasp only to have it do nothing. In fact, I came upon a nesting Cryptocheilus attenuatum (detailed nesting sequence/nest description is unreported) that went through an almost complete nesting sequence before I made a sharp move and scared it. I waited for and hour for it to come back, but it never did. In any case, I never get tired of seeing these species, this is my favorite genus of wasp. Keep up the good work...something is bound to happen...these wasp have to come from somewhere:-) It probably won't be as conspicuous as an Anoplius dragging a Lycosid around, though. You may have to literally dig something up, if their biology proves to be similar to P. planata.

 
wasp
i am easily as excited about this lady finding a spider as the two of you are, so it is not a bother for me at all. also, i am prepared to dig something up if need be, as i was not really expecting to find her catch something and then drag it off. the time spent watching this wasp is not bad at all... it is fun to watch it going about its business. so long as it stays in the area, i am going to keep on it.

Great shot
And chasing these things waiting for a capture can be exhausting. We appreciate the effort.

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