Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada

Species Megatibicen resonans - "Southern Resonant Cicada"

Can someone help ID this cicada? - Megatibicen resonans Can someone help ID this cicada? - Megatibicen resonans What is this?  - Megatibicen resonans Found on windowsill in July - Megatibicen resonans Cicada - Megatibicen resonans Cicada - Megatibicen resonans Found a cicada I haven't seen before. I think it's a neotibicen resonans - Megatibicen resonans Annual Cicada - Megatibicen resonans - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha (Free-living Hemipterans)
Superfamily Cicadoidea (Cicadas, Leafhoppers, and Treehoppers)
Family Cicadidae (Cicadas)
Subfamily Cicadinae
Genus Megatibicen
Species resonans ("Southern Resonant Cicada")
Other Common Names
Suggested: "Southern Dusk Singing Cicada," "Great Pine Barrens Cicada," "Southern Resonant Cicada"
Identification
T. resonans is our second largest eastern species and closely related to & frequently confused with Neotibicen auletes (Germar 1834), the "Northern Dusk Singing Cicada" (our largest).

These cicadas are colored a deep reddish-brown or rust with the typical black patterning seen in most Neotibicen species. T. resonans specimens are similar to auletes in shape and size, but do not exhibit the same olive coloration nor degree of white pruinosity seen in the latter.

This cicada species is also commonly confused with the very similar and sympatric Neotibicen figuratus (Walker 1858), "Fall Southeastern Dusk-singing Cicada". However, unlike T. figuratus, the anterior most basal wing cell is characteristically colored taupe (olive-tan) instead of black (SEE IMAGE BELOW).


COMPARE: Like Neotibicen resonans, T. figuratus specimens are similar in shape and size, but appear slightly more flattened/dorso-ventrally compressed. Unlike T. resonans, the anterior most basal wing cell is characteristically colored BLACK (may be subject to rare exception! ... the basal wing cell may be dark brown or reddish-brown in coloration - as has been observed in a couple Florida specimens).


Much of the central and south Florida material reviewed can be characterized as follows: They often possess reddish-tan dorsal markings on the abdomen (much as seen in winnemanna) and seem to have slightly longer wings by proportion, appearing slightly more gracile than specimens collected elsewhere.
*c. & s. Florida specimens usually possess light brown markings running along the dorsum of the abdomen, a trait not yet observed in specimens from GA, AL, SC or NC (per. observ.)

Regarding geographic coloration and morphologies, larger samples may be needed to further support these observations.

The call might be described as a rapid rattling..."Dree-Dree-Dree-Dree..etc. before winding down with a prolonged croaky Dreeeeee...."
Range
Southeast Coastal Plain and Fall-line Hills

FL, AL, GA, SC, & NC (Specimens observed)
LA (Louisiana - I have seen several specimens taken at lights in a couple of the FL Parishes of se. Louisiana)
MS (Mississippi - no specimens reviewed recently but this species does occur across the southern third or so of the state - Miss. records on page 148)
VA - Virginia (unconfirmed reports from se. coastal areas - possible ???)
Habitat
Pine flatwoods and Pine barrens of the coastal plain & low hill country
(Usu. associated with "Long-leaf" pines and sandy soils)
Season
Late summer.

July-September (North Carolina).
July-November (Gulf States & northern Florida).
Food
Seems to prefer pines

Populations in south central Florida, where auletes is absent, are often associated with pines and oaks.
Life Cycle
eggs usually laid in dead twigs, wood or bark
(occasionally eggs may be laid in living stems and twigs)

eggs hatch and nymphs burrow into the soil

nymphs feed on the sap in roots for several years (prefer pines, Pinus spp.)

Final instar nymphs emerge and develop into winged adults (emergence for this species usu. occurs at night - into early morning)
Remarks
Replaced by Neotibicen resh in western Gulf States (Louisiana & Texas)

Replaced by T. auletes in the north and in hardwood dominated habitats across the southeast incl. the Piedmont & Cumberland Plateaus (known only from localities east of the Miss. Riv.)

The calls of Neotibicen resh, Tibicen resonans and N. auletes are very similar and frequently confused with one another.

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This cicada is our second largest eastern species and most closely related to T. auletes (our largest). It frequents lowland pine forests where it largely replaces T. auletes in such habitats. There may be some geographic variability; specimens collected in coastal areas and in peninsular Florida tend to be lighter & more colorful.

Much of the central and south Florida material reviewed can be characterized as follows: They often possess reddish-tan dorsal markings on the abdomen (much as seen in winnemanna) and seem to have slightly longer wings by proportion, appearing slightly more gracile than specimens collected elsewhere.
*c. & s. Florida specimens usually possess light brown markings running along the dorsum of the abdomen, a trait not yet observed in specimens from GA, AL, SC or NC (per. observ.)

Regarding geographic coloration and morphologies, larger samples may be needed to further support these observations.
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Frequently confused and closely related - T. auletes, T. resh & T. resonans.
T. auletes is our LARGEST EASTERN Tibicen SPECIES.

T. resh

T. resonans