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Species Choristoneura carnana - Hodges#3645

Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Tortricoidea (Tortricid Moths)
Family Tortricidae (Tortricid Moths)
Subfamily Tortricinae
Tribe Archipini
Genus Choristoneura
No Taxon (fumiferana group)
Species carnana (Choristoneura carnana - Hodges#3645)
Hodges Number
3645
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Choristoneura carnana (Barnes & Busck, 1920)
Tortrix carnana Barnes & Busck, 1920 (1)
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet perhaps from Latin carne (flesh, meat) for the flesh-colored or reddish brown features of the moth.
Size
Forewing length 11.5-14.5 mm. (2)
Identification
Adult - both sexes with rust crossed by a broad, pale antemedial band blending to white in the tornal area. (2)
Larva - rust-colored. (2)
Range
California. MPG shows a single record in Colorado. (3)
Type locality: Camp Baldy, San Bernardino Mountains, California.
Food
Primary host in southern California is bigcone Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa), in the Sierra Nevada Mountains it's Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). (2)
Print References
Barnes, W., & A. Busck, 1920. Contributions to the Natural History of the Lepidoptera of North America 4(3): 214. (1)
Works Cited
1.Contributions to the Natural History of the Lepidoptera of North America
Barnes, W., & Busck, A. . 1920. The Review Press, Decatur, Ill. 4(3): 211-248.
2.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
3.North American Moth Photographers Group