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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#726839
Small moth - Crocidosema plebejana

Small moth - Crocidosema plebejana
Fort Bend County, Texas, USA
November 21, 2012
Attracted to light

Images of this individual: tag all
Small moth - Crocidosema plebejana Small moth - Crocidosema plebejana

Moved, Crocidosema plebejana
Moved from Eucosmini.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Good match: 3274
3274 – Crocidosema plebejana – Cotton Tipworm Moth

Appears to be a coastal moth, and many times, coastal moths show up in the Houston area, including where this image was taken.

http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=3274

 
Eucosmini = Eucosma sp?
I looked through the Eucosma's 30xx-31xx, but none looked like this one. It seems to be in some other area (like maybe 27xx or 32xx).

 
Looks a bit like the entries for #3252.1
http://bugguide.net/node/view/677511

 
Eucosmini is the tribe that E
Eucosmini is the tribe that Eucosma and a large number of other genera reside in. It is a very speciose group and for many of them I will only give solid IDs if they are dissected. Your suggestion seems likely though, and I would treat P. sepia as a tentative ID.

 
Sounds good
Thanks for the clarification of Eucosma. I now see how it groups a range of moths. And I agree about the "tentative" ID. It looks close, but not close enough for the high level of confidence needed for a true positive ID. I'll keep scouring MPG as time allows, and if I see something better, I'll post an update.

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