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Photo#73072
Syrphini? - Dasysyrphus creper - female

Syrphini? - Dasysyrphus creper - Female
Mount Pinos summit, elev. 8831 ft (2692m), Kern County, California, USA
August 22, 2006
Feeding in Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus (Green Rabbitbrush).

I got stuck using an old key to the genera of Syrphidae (in Cole & Schlinger, The Flies of Western North America.1968, Univ. of Calif. Press). Dasysyrphus seems to come close in abdominal pattern, though not color, but is not listed in that key. Didea seemed the closest in the key.

So, what is it?

Images of this individual: tag all
Syrphini? - Dasysyrphus creper - female Syrphini? - Dasysyrphus creper - female Syrphini? - Dasysyrphus creper - female

Moved
Moved from Dasysyrphus.

I think Dasysyrphus creper, u
I think Dasysyrphus creper, using the new Locke and Skevington Key (Zootaxa 3660, 2013). It could also be D. lotus, but I think it's D. creper.

The maculae of tergites 3-4 do not reach the edge of the abdomen, and are quite curved (unlike D. richardi, and more curved than D. lotus), meeting in the middle and broadly touching the anterior edge of the tergite. D. lotus has somewhat similar markings, but they're less strongly curved, though you are within their range as well.

 
I think you're correct, Kelsey -
Just looked at that paper. Its a beautiful fly and I hope to see it again coming year and get a specimen.
Was about to move it to species, but Charlie beat me to it.
By the way, I noticed you're interested in Mimulus, a fascinating complex with a number of new species on the horizon.

 
Oh goodness, don't get me sta
Oh goodness, don't get me started on Mimulus guttatus :^)

(for some reason, now that I'm discussing my study system, I feel like I should be less lazy regarding italics... wonder why)

Fortunately the two species I work on are fairly well defined, although one has two geographical races that are probably actually different species. And, fortunately, various folks have done all the bidirectional crosses and natural history research and so on, so we know a lot about my section of 7 (8?) species.

But elsewhere in the genus... guttatus is interesting, aurantiacus is another interesting complex (I saw a nice talk on the phylogeny of that species complex this summer)... wow. Species diversity is amazing!

 
I think you're correct, Kelsey -
Just looked at that paper. Its a beautiful fly and I hope to see it again coming year and get a specimen.
Was about to move it to species, but Charlie beat me to it.

 
Excellent - glad to have the
Excellent - glad to have the second opinion! It is definitely a lovely fly - and those are some great pictures.

Dasysyrphus
With the comma shaped spots and the dense hairs on the eyes, it is clearly a female of the genus Dasysyrphus. The species are a bit difficult to tell.

 
Thank you, Martin,
so there are Dasysyrphus out here in CA.

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