Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information about the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Species Metcalfa pruinosa - Citrus Flatid Planthopper

fuzzy little guy - Metcalfa pruinosa Blue Tinted Planthopper - Metcalfa pruinosa Planthopper Nymph ? - Metcalfa pruinosa Citrus Flatid Planthopper - Metcalfa pruinosa Rotting tree dweller 38 (hopper) - Metcalfa pruinosa Metcalfa pruinosa? - Metcalfa pruinosa Metcalfa pruinosa Citrus Flatid Planthopper - Metcalfa pruinosa
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha (Free-living Hemipterans)
Superfamily Fulgoroidea (Planthoppers)
Family Flatidae (Flatid Planthoppers)
Subfamily Flatinae
Tribe Nephesini
Genus Metcalfa
Species pruinosa (Citrus Flatid Planthopper)
Other Common Names
Floury Mothbug (Dr Hamilton's comment)
Explanation of Names
Metcalfa pruinosa (Say 1830)
pruinosa = 'frosty' (refers to the waxy coating)
Common name comes from the fact that it is often seen on Citrus, but also a wide range of other host plants.
Size
adults 5.5-8 mm
Identification
Grey to brown depending on how much floury coating is present. Two dark spots (and often more) near the base of the wing are characteristic.

Nymphs are mainly white with tail ends covered with waxy filaments. These typically form two "tails", but may cover the entire body and surrounding plant surfaces with fluff.
Range
e NA to NM / Mex. / W. Indies; adventive in Europe,* Korea(1)(1)
*first recorded in ne. Italy in 1979, widely spread since(2)
Food
extremely polyphagous(1)
Remarks
Seldom causes economic damage except to plants weakened by other factors, e.g. frost(3)
Of considerable concern in orchards and vineyards in so. Europe(1)
Internet References
Genus page - Univ. Delaware(1)
Featured Creatures - Mead (2004)(3)
Works Cited
1.Bartlett C.R. (2012-) Planthoppers of North America
2.Alien terrestrial arthropods of Europe
Roques A., Kenis M., Lees D., Lopez-Vaamonde C., Rabitsch W., Rasplus J.-Y., Roy D., eds. 2010. BioRisk 4 Special Issue; 2 vols., 1028 pp.
3.EDIS -- Electronic Data Information Source of UF/IFAS Extension