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Photo#734521
Chalcid from Quercus prinoides gall - Brasema gemmarii - female

Chalcid from Quercus prinoides gall - Brasema gemmarii - Female
Eastern Moors, Nantucket, Nantucket County, Massachusetts, USA
September 11, 2012
Size: 2.2 mm
Emerged from an unidentified gall on dwarf chinquapin oak, collected 8/4/2012.

Images of this individual: tag all
Chalcid from Quercus prinoides gall - Brasema gemmarii - female Quercus prinoides gall - Brasema gemmarii

Moved
Moved from Brasema.
Gary just sent me an email saying: "the eupelmid you sent is a described species after all. It is a female Brasema gemmarii (Ashmead). Officially, the species is still classified as Anastatus gemmarii (Ashmead), but is incorrectly assigned to genus. I simply have not had an excuse to transfer it yet."

Moved
Moved from Eupelmidae.
Gary-- I still have the specimen. Would you like to examine it?

Moved

Eupelmid…
These are principally egg parasitoids, but there are species that are larval and pupal parasitoids of dipterans (including gall midges and cynipids) as well.

See reference here.

 
Eupelmid
This is a female of the genus Brasema Cameron (Eupelmidae: Eupelminae). It is most similar to Brasema flavovariegatus (Ashmead 1888), but a darker color pattern suggests likely a new species. Although Brasema is one of the more speciose eupelmid genera in North America, this is almost unique within the genus in having a banded fore wing. Because of the hyaline cross band on the fore wing it could be mistaken for a member of Anastatus Motschulsky, most of whom have banded fore wings. However, note that the cross band is at the apex of the venation (postmarginal and stigmal veins), whereas in Anastatus the cross vein is somewhere behind the marginal vein. There are also other structural differences between the two genera that are not readily visible in the photo.

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