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Photo#736281
Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella

Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella
Mt. Toby, Sunderland, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA
May 30, 2012
Unfortunately I didn't get around to removing the pupa from the plastic bag, so the adult rubbed off a lot of scales.

Images of this individual: tag all
Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella Red oak feeding gelechioid - Pubitelphusa latifasciella

Moved
Moved from Litini.

Terry's suspicion is confirmed by DNA barcoding.
BOLD:AAC8095.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Litini
Definitely something in Litini (Gelechiidae). There appear to be remnants of a dark, pale, dark pattern from base to apex on the forewing, so Telphusa latifasciella might be the best bet.

Ha!
I'm glad that even contributing editors make that mistake! I feel like an space alien kidnapping and torturing collected specimens when that happens! :)

 
You think ...
We should report him to the Massachusetts Department of Larva and Protective Services :)

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