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Species Eucosma elongana - Hodges#2952

Phaneta elongana - Hodges #2952 - Eucosma elongana
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Tortricoidea (Tortricid Moths)
Family Tortricidae (Tortricid Moths)
Subfamily Olethreutinae
Tribe Eucosmini
Genus Eucosma
Species elongana (Eucosma elongana - Hodges#2952)
Hodges Number
2952
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Eucosma elongana (Walsingham, 1879) (1)
Semasia elongana Walsingham, 1879 (2)
Thodia elongana (3)
Eucosma elongana
Phaneta elongana
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet means "elongated" for the "very long" palpi "projecting more than three times the length of the head beyond it." (2)
Numbers
Powell and Opler (2009) stated there are more than 100 species of the genus Phaneta in America north of Mexico. (4), (5)
Size
Heinrich (1923) listed a wingspan of 25-30 mm. (3)
Range
California to Colorado, north to at least Alberta and British Columbia.
Holotype collected in northern Oregon. (3)
Moth Photographers Group - large map with some distribution data.
Season
The main flight period appears to be June through August. (6)
Food
Larval host is tall ragwort (Senecio serra). (7)
Print References
Heinrich, C., 1923. Revision of the North American moths of the subfamily Eucosminae of the family Olethreutidae. United States National Museum Bulletin No. 123. 51; fig. 128. (3)
Walsingham, Lord. 1879. North-American Torticidae. Illustrations of typical specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the collection of the British Museum, 4: 56; Pl.73, f.2. (2)
Works Cited
1.Revised world catalogue of Eucopina, Eucosma, Pelochrista, and Phaneta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae: Eucosmini)
Todd M. Gilligan, Donald J. Wright. 2013. Zootaxa 3746(2): 301–337.
2.North-American Torticidae
Thomas, Lord Walsingham. 1879. Illustrations of typical specimens of Lepidoptera Heterocera in the collection of the British Museum. 4.
3.Revision of the North American moths of the subfamily Eucosminae of the family Olethreutidae
Carl Heinrich. 1923. United States National Museum Bulletin 123: 1-298.
4.Check list of the Lepidoptera of America north of Mexico.
Hodges, et al. (editors). 1983. E. W. Classey, London. 284 pp.
5.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
6.North American Moth Photographers Group
7.HOSTS - The Hostplants and Caterpillars Database
8.BOLD: The Barcode of Life Data Systems