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Family Derbidae - Derbid Planthoppers

Derbidae - Anotia uhleri Derbidae, Patara vanduzeei - Patara vanduzeei - male Otiocerus degeeri? - Apache degeeri hopper - Cedusa derbids - Cedusa - male - female Anotia Unknown Order/Family  - Patara vanduzeei I think this might be Otiocerus francilloni - Otiocerus francilloni
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha (Free-living Hemipterans)
Superfamily Fulgoroidea (Planthoppers)
Family Derbidae (Derbid Planthoppers)
Explanation of Names
Derbidae Spinola 1839
Numbers
70 spp. in 14 genera in our area(1), ~1700 spp. in ~160 genera worldwide(2)
Size
8-11 mm(3)
Identification
Derbids generally can be recognized by having the row of spines on the second hind tarsal segment and having the apical segment of the beak short. The head is compressed – slightly or greatly(1)
Habitat
woody fungi on rotten logs(3)
Food
immatures feed on fungal hyphae(1)
Remarks
Nymphs feed on fungi. Adults just seem to hang around on vegetation waiting on others passing by. --Andy Hamilton
Internet References
Derbidae of North America - Univ. Delaware(1)