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Photo#753007
Tegenaria duellica (=gigantea) - The Giant House spider - Eratigena atrica - female

Tegenaria duellica (=gigantea) - The Giant House spider - Eratigena atrica - Female
Bay Center 98527 Willapa, Pacific County, Washington, USA
March 18, 2013
Size: body length ~21mm
The giant house spider (Tegenaria duellica; formerly known as T. gigantea) is a member of the genus Tegenaria and is a close relative of both the domestic house spider and the infamous hobo spider. The bite is not harmful to humans so one source says.

The giant house spider is indigenous to north western Europe. However, it was unwittingly introduced to the Pacific Northwest of North America circa 1900 due to human activity and strongly increased in numbers for the last decade.

giant house spider
I found one of these in my pool skimmer. It is about 2 1/2 inches in overall length. I was concerned it might be poisonous but I gather it is not harmful...?

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