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Photo#755246
Cynips douglasii? - Cynips douglasii

Cynips douglasii? - Cynips douglasii
Davis, Yolo County, California, USA
March 25, 2013
Is this the bisexual generation of Cynips douglasii? Found on Quercus lobata, close to where this C. douglasii gall was found.


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Cynips douglasii? - Cynips douglasii Cynips douglasii? - Cynips douglasii Cynips douglasii? - Cynips douglasii

Moved
Moved from Gall Wasps.

yes
Good call! I asked Ron about this one too. He agrees it's probably the spring generation of Cynips douglasii.

One thing you can do to be more sure that it's a spring gall (and not, say, a just-starting-to-develop summer/fall gall), is to cut it open and see what's inside. Sometimes you might have to cut a few of them open to get a clear idea of what's going on, because sometimes the gall inducer has been killed by one thing or another before you find the gall. If you find a nearly fully developed larva, or a pupa, in March or April, then it would be a spring gall. If the larva is so small you can hardly see it, it may be a newly-developing summer gall.

I've seen galls like this in late April in Kern County that had cynipid pupae in them. Somehow I've not seen them closer to the Bay Area though.

Moved
Moved from Unidentified Galls.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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