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Photo#75595
Whitebanded Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes

Whitebanded Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes
Wellesley, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA
September 1, 2006
Entirely yellow with no distingishing marks (to my untrained eye).

Images of this individual: tag all
Whitebanded Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes Whitebanded Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes Whitebanded Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes

Moved
Moved from Goldenrod Crab Spider.
Sorry we were confusing, but the ridge across the face says this is Misumenoides. That's what we meant to say. We pointed to the images on the Misumena page but only to indicate how this is misumenoides. Sorry for the confusion.

Moved to Guide

Awesome shots!
What camera do you use?

 
Equipment
Ashley,

Thanks for the compliment! I try to enjoy nature and sometimes I accidentally take a nice picture.

Here are the details on the "eye close-up" shot:

Nikon D200
70-180mm f/4.5-5.6D ED AF Zoom Micro-Nikkor@180mm
Probably with a Nikon 6T close-up lens
f/20 1/250s ISO 100 with Nikon SB-800 off-camera

Aren't you glad you asked? :-)

Bill

 
I AM glad I asked. =)
Thanks for the description! I'm using a Fuji S2 Pro (body by Nikon) and still trying to learn the ropes. I'm having depth of field issues and also find that sometimes when I try to photograph a very tiny bug, the legs and fine details get lost in pixely artifacts. I'm shooting at ISO 100, but maybe I just don't have enough pixels. Or something. Who knows; I'll just keep experimenting!

 
DOF
Ashley,

The higher the magnification the more you need to stop down to get a reasonable Depth Of Field (DOF).
You need to do this even if you're getting into the diffraction limited range of apertures.
A picture that's a little unsharp due to diffraction is far better than one that is Out Of Focus (OOF) due to DOF.

Keep trying!
Bill

 
Thanks for the tips!
I'll definitely keep trying till I get it right. Bright sunlight would help, as currently I've been limited to a shutterspeed of 60 due to use of the flash, even during the day. Maybe a faster lens would help, too, but I don't really understand that concept. I'll keep learning though! =)

 
Faster than 1/60s
Ashley,

Use Shutter or Manual mode for shutter speeds higher than 1/60s.
I think you can probably go to 1/250s

Bill

 
Excellent -
I'll give it a try!

Nice ridge on the face through the eyes
Unmistakeably Misumenoides! Check out the closeups on the Misumena Info page here. (And we just added your fine closeup to that information page!)

 
Thanks so much
This was my top choice but I was thrown by the fact I see no red or brown that the description mentions.

I'm glad you like the eyes!

I have quite a number of angles. I can post more images if there is any other feature you'd like me to zoom in on.

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