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Photo#757662
Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta

Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta
Chef Menteur Pass, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA
August 27, 2012
Size: 1.5 mm
I found two of these in a vacuum sample from my Spartina patens-dominated marsh research site. I haven't found any in my previous samples, so they are not very common. The genitalia certainly appear very distinctive, as do the spurs that project backward from the base of the hindlegs, but I'm not sure if it will be sufficient for an ID.

Images of this individual: tag all
Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta Yellow psillid (?) from brackish marsh - Craspedolepta

Moved
Moved from Psyllidae.

Craspedolepta
The male genitalia, as you hypothesized, are indeed distinctive. The structure in the 4th pic indicated by the blue arrow is the meracanthus, which is a common structure in most psyllids but is well developed in this genus.

This is a particularly diverse genus in North America, many of its members associated with Asteraceae.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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