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Genus Aedes

 
 
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The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence.
By Kraemer et al.
Scientific Data 2: 150035., 2015
Full Text

Kraemer et al. 2015. The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence. Scientific Data 2: 150035.

Abstract
Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main vectors transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses. Despite being pathogens of global public health importance, knowledge of their vectors’ global distribution remains patchy and sparse. A global geographic database of known occurrences of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus between 1960 and 2014 was compiled. Herein we present the database, which comprises occurrence data linked to point or polygon locations, derived from peer-reviewed literature and unpublished studies including national entomological surveys and expert networks. We describe all data collection processes, as well as geo-positioning methods, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the first comprehensive global database of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence, consisting of 19,930 and 22,137 geo-positioned occurrence records respectively. Both datasets can be used for a variety of mapping and spatial analyses of the vectors and, by inference, the diseases they transmit.

Keys to the larvae of Texas mosquitoes with notes on recent synonymy. I. Key to general and to the species of the genus Aedes.
By Breland, O.P.
The Texas journal of science 4(1): 65–72., 1952
Breland, O.P. 1952. Keys to the larvae of Texas mosquitoes with notes on recent synonymy. I. Key to general and to the species of the genus Aedes. The Texas journal of science 4(1): 65–72.

The identity of Aedes bimaculatus (Coquillett) and a new subspecies of Aedes fulvus (Wiedemann) from the US (Culicidae),
By Ross, E.S.
Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 45(6): 143-151., 1943
Full PDF

Ross, E.S. 1943. The identity of Aedes bimaculatus (Coquillett) and a new subspecies of Aedes fulvus (Wiedemann) from the United States (Diptera, Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 45(6): 143-151.

This paper presents evidence to show that two distinct species of Aedes occurring in the United States are both at present identified as Coquillett’s bimaculatus. The true bimaculatus, described from Brownsville, Texas, and ranging from central Texas to El Salvador, is very distinct from the “bimaculatus” collected throughout the southeastern United States which is here described as a new subspecies of the Neotropical fulvus (Wiedemann).

Competition and resistance to starvation in larvae of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes.
By Barrera, R.
Ecological Entomology. 21(2): 117-127., 1996
Wiley Online Library

Barrera, R. 1996. Competition and resistance to starvation in larvae of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes. Ecological Entomology. 21(2): 117-127.

Keywords:
Competition; species coexistence; starvation resistance; respiration; mosquito larvae; Aedes aegypti; Aedes albopictus; Aedes triseriatus.

Abstract.
1. Hypotheses about declining populations of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes following the invasion by additional species were tested.

2. The larval competition hypothesis was studied experimentally in pure and mixed cultures of Aedes aegypti (L.), A.albopictus (Skuse) and A.triseriatus (Say). The experiments used decomposing leaf litter in the laboratory, as opposed to most previous research which used non-natural food.

Spread of Aedes albopictus and decline of Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Florida.
By O'Meara GF, Evans LF Jr, Gettman AD, Cuda JP.
Journal of Medical Entomology 32(4): 554-562., 1995
PubMed

O'Meara GF, Evans LF Jr, Gettman AD, Cuda JP. 1995. Spread of Aedes albopictus and decline of Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Florida. Journal of Medical Entomology 32(4): 554-562.

Abstract
Waste tires and other types of artificial containers were sampled for immature Aedes to monitor changes in the occurrence of Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in Florida. The initial invasion and spread of Ae. albopictus in Florida occurred in the northern part of Florida. Throughout this region, major declines in the abundance of [i]Ae.

The rise of the invasives and decline of the natives: insights revealed from adult pops of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes
By Rochlin et al.
Biological Invasions, 2012
Full PDF

Rochlin, I., R. Gaugler, E. Williges, A. Farajollahi. 2012. The rise of the invasives and decline of the natives: insights revealed from adult populations of container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in temperate North America. Biological Invasions

Abstract
Container-inhabiting Aedes mosquitoes are successful invaders and important arthropod-borne disease vectors worldwide. In North America, a subtropical assemblage containing introduced Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti and the native Aedes triseriatus have served as a model for investigating ecological interactions during invasions and focused on the outcomes at the larval stages.

Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range.
By Eisen L, Moore CG.
Journal of Medical Entomology 50(3): 467-78., 2013
Full Text

Eisen L, Moore CG. 2013. Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range. Journal of Medical Entomology 50(3): 467-78.

U.S. range of Ae. aegypti

Counties in the continental United States with collection records of Ae. aegypti from 1986 to 2010 (shaded red), based on information from a database for invasive mosquito species curated by C. G. Moore of Colorado State University.

Effects of temperature and larval diet on development rates and survival of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in north Queensland.
By Tun-Lin et al.
Medical and Veterinary Entomology 14(1): 31–37., 2000
Abstract

W. Tun-Lin, T.R. Burkot and B.H. Kay. 2000. Effects of temperature and larval diet on development rates and survival of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in north Queensland, Australia. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 14(1): 31–37.

Immature development times, survival rates and adult size (wing-lengths) of the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) were studied in the laboratory at temperatures of 10–40°C. The duration of development from egg eclosion (hatching of the first instar) to adult was inversely related to temperature, ranging from 7.2 ± 0.2 days at 35°C to 39.7 ± 2.3 days at 15°C. The minimum temperature threshold for development (t) was determined as 8.3 ± 3.6°C and the thermal constant (K) was 181.2 ± 36.1 day-degrees above the threshold. Maximum survival rates of 88–93% were obtained between 20 and 30°C. Wing-length was inversely related to temperature. The sex ratio (♀:♂) was 1 : 1 at all temperatures tested (15, 20, 25 and 35°C) except 30°C (4 : 3).

 
 
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