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Photo#766011
Phorid - midge parasitoid? - Megaselia nantucketensis - male

Phorid - midge parasitoid? - Megaselia nantucketensis - Male
Massachusetts, USA
May 1, 2013
Size: 1.8 mm
Last spring I collected Macrodiplosis niveipila (Cecidomyiidae) galls on Nantucket Island and the larvae burrowed into a sand/peat mixture that I kept in the refrigerator over the winter. Several adult midges and platygastrid wasps have emerged, and yesterday this fly emerged. Could it be a parasitoid, or is it just a contaminant from the soil?

Images of this individual: tag all
Phorid - midge parasitoid? - Megaselia nantucketensis - male Phorid - midge parasitoid? - Megaselia nantucketensis - male

Moved
Moved from Megaselia.

This is the type specimen.

Moved
Moved from Scuttle Flies.
Brian Brown says it doesn't key out to any described North American species.

Phorids associated with gall midges
I asked Ray Gagne and Brian Brown, and both pointed me to this paper:

Robinson, W. H. and B. V. Brown. 1993. Life history and immature stages of two species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) predatory on gall-inhabiting insects. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 95: 404-411

I haven't had a chance to look that up yet, but I will send Brian the specimen in a few weeks (waiting to see if any others emerge first).

Moved
Moved from Flies.

Size?
Could that fly fit inside a midge larva or pupa?

 
1.8 mm
I think so--it's substantially smaller than the adult midges.

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