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Photo#767750
Cariblatta lutea lutea?  From Franklinton, NC - Cariblatta lutea

Cariblatta lutea lutea? From Franklinton, NC - Cariblatta lutea
Franklinton County, North Carolina, USA
May 7, 2013
Size: Over 7mm long
I caught five or so of these little cockroaches on a road side with big oak trees above and a lot of oak leaves and some pine leaves in Franklinton, North Carolina. They were in the leaves. Are these Cariblatta lutea lutea? I caught these a few days ago so they have been in a container for a few days before I took these pictures. They jump well. They are fast and can climb slippery plastic but they are not very good at it. I do not know if they are female or male. I did not take a good look at them, they are very small, over 7mm long.

Images of this individual: tag all
Cariblatta lutea lutea?  From Franklinton, NC - Cariblatta lutea Cariblatta lutea lutea?  From Franklinton, NC - Cariblatta lutea

Sub-adult
All of the ones I caught are probably sub-adult. Two of mine molted to adult. They were all about the same size. They seem to get less transparent and more creamy colored when about to molt soon. These roaches are very common here.

Moved

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

I suspect you're right about the species. If the experts concur, these will be BG's first images from NC.

Welcome to BugGuide!

 
Thank you
Thank you. On Blattodea.speciesfile.org it says that they were found in North Carolina. I found another one (only one) in Wake Forest, North Carolina today. It is just slightly smaller and more dull than the others. It was living in a rotten piece of log beside a tree that looks like a Willow Oak Tree (I am not sure if it is a Willow Oak). I found many Parcoblatta too in that piece of wood. It was probably dryer there than where the others were. I will post pictures soon. Do you have any pictures of Cariblatta lutea minima?

 
I was referring just to the species.
We don't have any of these ID'd to the subspecies level. You can see the entire (small) collection here.

 
Cariblatta lutea minima no wings?
I read this from here (look at the comments).
http://bugguide.net/node/view/442153

There are only two subspecies listed on Blattodea.speciesfile.org of Cariblatta lutea.
I found this.
https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/handle/1811/3972/v52n05_296.pdf?sequence=1
I cannot find much about them.

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