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Photo#768723
Springtail - Morulodes serratus

Springtail - Morulodes serratus
Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada
April 13, 2013
Size: ~ .9 mm
4 ocelli and the 6th abd. segment is below the 5th. I also see some fine setae laterally on the cheeks that are interesting (top view). Nodules at the base of the macro setae are apparent on a few of the abdominal photos so I would think they are present along the whole abdomen and elsewhere but my set up couldn't pull out the detail. These Neanurinae are proving difficult to photograph since the long translucent setae blend and blur all the detail even if I do get it in focus.

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Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus Springtail - Morulodes serratus

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Morulodes serratus
With characteristic eyepatch having 3 anterior ocelli and 1 posterior one. Typically are the long serrate macrosetae. Juvenile specimen.

 
Awesome!
Thanks again for your encouragement. I'm always nervous about the quality of the photos I post. Your mention of the serrate macrosetae explains the lighting issues that are apparent in these photos with the excessive glare they produce.

That aside, I'll chalk these up to success for exposing a seldom photographed species.

 
thanks for another wonderful addition
keep up the great job...

 
Thank-you
It really is a peaceful pastime poking around in the undercover of the forest while pushing the limits of cheap technology. Hmmm...

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