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Photo#77081
Typhoctes peculiaris mirabilis (Bradynobaenidae) - Typhoctes peculiaris - female

Typhoctes peculiaris mirabilis (Bradynobaenidae) - Typhoctes peculiaris - Female
16 mi W of Magdalena; at NRAO VLA radio dishes; dry sandy desert scurub, Socorro County, New Mexico, USA
August 18, 2006
Size: ~1/2 inch, if I recall
As I was being led around the NRAO-VLA on the guided walking tour with the rest of my collecting companions, I saw this curious specimen scurrying around amongst some real ants of similar appearance (which I also collected). After a short chase and some violent clawing at the low-lying shrubberies, I came up with this specimen. As part of my original mission was to collect Southwestern Mutillids, I was eager to think that this was one, and my best guess was a Myrmosula sp. I'm starting to doubt that now, and I'm thinking that this could be a Bradynobaenid wasp, and not a mutillid at all. Any input is welcome (especially from KEVIN WILLIAMS and other specialists...) Thanks!

PS: And if somehow this is just some weird Formicid, which I'm sure it's not, I'll give up and retire at 17. ;)

PPS: I have much, much higher resolution versions of these photos (you could easily count all the setae) if anybody wants them.

Images of this individual: tag all
Typhoctes peculiaris mirabilis (Bradynobaenidae) - Typhoctes peculiaris - female Typhoctes peculiaris mirabilis (Bradynobaenidae) - Typhoctes peculiaris - female Typhoctes peculiaris mirabilis (Bradynobaenidae) - Typhoctes peculiaris - female

I know these pretty well actu
I know these pretty well actually this is indeed a bradynobaenidae. it genus is typhoctes, I don't know the species though.remember that mutillids have one whole thorax, while bradynobaenidae have their thorax divided in two segments like the one in your photo.don't worry you won't have to retire, formicids all have jointed antenna unlike the mutillids, tiphiids, or bradynobaenidae. I love mutillids though.

 
Ah, thank you for that confir
Ah, thank you for that confirmation!

Also, is it really so that all mutillids have a completely fused thorax? I had been leaning towards Myrmosula before (though I know that's not what it is now) because I thought perhaps the Myrmosines' thoraces did have a division. I may have been mistaken, but see this page:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/68242

 
your right that myrmosula doe
your right that myrmosula does have a divided segment, but myrmosula also don't have a felt line(mutillids do), they are eventually going to break off from mutillids and become a separate family all of their own, the reason being is that they have characteristics that aren't seen in mutillids. In addition, I have three typhoctes in my collection that look exactly like that(although in entomology has I have learned looks can be decieveing).

 
Typhoctes peculiaris mirabilis
The species is Typhoctes mirabilis peculiaris, normal T. peculiaris have very little pubescence on the head, unlike this subspecies with dense golden setae on the head. I prefer not to use subspecific classifications, but I'm not sure if this is a valid species or just a variant of normal Typhoctes peculiaris.

 
Synonymy
I found out recently that T. peculiaris mirabilis was synonymized under T. peculiaris. Thought you guys might want to know.

 
haha, thanks
Haha, thanks for your input. Now I suppose we just need a contributing editor to make a new page for the Bradynobaenidae family and so forth.

 
geez took you long enough :)
geez took you long enough :) I was waiting for your comment

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