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Photo#77245
Crabronid - Cerceris bicornuta - male

Crabronid - Cerceris bicornuta - Male
fayetteville, washington County, Arkansas, USA
September 13, 2006
Size: about 15mm
now this looks more like an Eucerceris species than the last one i posted... well they look quite similar, however i like calling this one Eucerceris more than the last.

Images of this individual: tag all
Crabronid - Cerceris bicornuta - male Crabronid - Cerceris bicornuta - male Crabronid - Cerceris bicornuta - male Crabronid - Cerceris bicornuta - male

Cute:-)
This wonderful portrait really captures this wasp's 'personality!'

Sphecid
If the Eucerceris have the same hindfemur modification as the Cerceris then this is possible. We have only two Eucerceris in the east (canaliculata and zonata) and neither is pictured anywhere. Another western species is pictured at Cedar Creek's site. I can't quite see the wing veins on your wasp. Really lovely wasp though.

 
Sphecid
it certainly could be a Cerceris, although i have never seen one that looked quite like this. i took quite a few pictures, i could go back through them and see if i have any that show the wing veins if it would help.

 
They look quite alike indeed...
Simply because this one is the male of the female you posted previously. All differences are due to sexual dimorphism. Female has a much thicker head, which also occurs in the very similar Mediterranean species Cerceris tuberculata, by far our largest one.

 
well...
thank you very much for the information Richard... the two heads juxtaposed look nothing alike, wow.

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