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Photo#773610
Unknown Fly - Trupanea wheeleri - female

Unknown Fly - Trupanea wheeleri - Female
1.6 mi. N. of Antelope Fire Control Station, Willow Springs, San Benito County, California, USA
May 20, 2013
Size: 3.8mm length.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Fly - Trupanea wheeleri - female Unknown Fly - Trupanea wheeleri - female Unknown Fly - Trupanea wheeleri - female

Moved
Moved from Trupanea vicina.

 
Thanks, Martin!
.

 
Thanks to both
Martin & Ron for getting the correct ID on this guy.

Moved
Moved from Flies.

Trupanea vicina, female
Note wing pattern

 
Thank you Ron
for the species ID.

 
My pleasure, Gary
This is a nicely shot series that may help others self-ID.

 
Hi Ron
I just finished looking at Foote & Blanc, 1963. For T. wheeleri they say: "No other species of Trupanea having a narrow dark ray from the stigma to vein m has as extensive a dark streak on vein M3+cu1--this area of infuscation extends from the base of the vein to its midpoint or beyond". It looks to me like my specimen has the "extensive dark streak on vein M3+Cu1". If so, then my guy would be T. wheeleri, I think. In addition, looking at the distribution maps in Foote & Blanc, 1963, T. vincina appears to occur mostly in southern California, while T. wheeleri occurs in San Benito county, which is where I found my guy. Of course, ranges may have changed significantly since 1963. What do you think?

 
I based my ID strictly on observation.
Gary, I'm no scientist and don't know from parts. I do know the wings on yours match the sample provided and that T. wheeleri is different. See this example, IDed by Martin Hauser:

Hope this helps; it's as far as I can take it. Note that Foote published a book in 1993, referenced on the Info pages of both species.

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