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Photo#774019
Surrender - Myrmecocystus kennedyi

Surrender - Myrmecocystus kennedyi
Sawtooth National Forest, Twin Falls County, Idaho, USA
May 20, 2013
These ants appear to be the same species. I don't know if this was a raid or just moving to another place. The ants being carried didn't seem to put up much of a fight. They usually exited the hole carried by another ant, but in some cases they were pulled out of the hole. Once grabbed by the carrier ant they would curl up into the position seen in the photos. What's going on here?

Images of this individual: tag all
Surrender - Myrmecocystus kennedyi Surrender - Myrmecocystus kennedyi

Moved
A species originally described from Idaho. This could either be experienced workers carrying naive nestmates to a new nest site, or raiders victorious in a territorial battle "enslaving" workers from the vanquished colony. Both behaviors are well-documented in the closely related M. mim-icus.

 
So interesting.
I saw this behavior in some ants crossing a trail in Yosemite. Always wondered what was up!

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