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Photo#77542
Need some help with this one

Need some help with this one
Hercules Glades Wilderness, Taney County, Missouri, USA
September 16, 2006
Size: Approx. 15mm

Images of this individual: tag all
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Ascaloptynx
Larva of Ascaloptynx sp.

Moved
Moved from Owlflies.

Identification – Ascalaphidae sp.
ID confirmed

Ascalaphidae
This is an owlfly larva. Very similar to antlion larvae, but (1) sit on flat open areas (not in pits) (2) have eyes that are on enlarged bumps on either side of the head. Great shots!

 
That's super! Our first owlfly larva!
I've wondered often what their larvae look like. Great find, Kevin!

 
Thanks!
I wish I could take all the credit, but it was actually my six year old son who spotted this guy. We were out looking for tarantulas (one of the more unusual residents of Hercules Glades) when my son spied it. Apparently tarantulas are not the only unusual residents!

Antlion larva
is my guess also. Apparently in a majority of antlion species the larvae do not make "doodlebug holes." Possibly this is a larva of one of the giant antlions.

 
Ant lions
Indeed, only the members of one tribe of the Antlions make trap nests. The majority of the 90 North American species are free roaming and not often seen. This appears to be a whopper. But I don't know the average size of the free roamers.

Nice shot!
yea, it looks like a immature antlion, but that is very large! so maybe it is something else.

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