Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#775601
Anasimyia interpuncta on a Golden Alexanders flower (Zizia aurea) in a hay field in Walpole, New Hampshire - 11:03AM - Lejops

Anasimyia interpuncta on a Golden Alexanders flower (Zizia aurea) in a hay field in Walpole, New Hampshire - 11:03AM - Lejops
Walpole, New Hampshire, USA, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, USA
May 23, 2013
Size: 1/2in (1.27cm) long
Here is the URL to a photo of another of the same species of fly taken in Sweden. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tidig_dammblomfluga03527.jpg
Note,it is listed on Wikipedia as a European species.

Moved
Moved from Syrphid Flies.

 
Anasimyia interpuncta ???
Thanks for helping me ID the fly in my photo. I found an image of a female Anasimyia interpuncta. Is Anasimyia considered a separate species by some? Here is the URL to the Wikipedia photo -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tidig_dammblomfluga03527.jpg

 
Apparently, it's a European species. (from Wikipedia)
I know it not, which isn't surprising.

 
The Correct North American name?
Hi Ron,
Is the fly in question a European species, or does it just have a different scientific name in North America? What do you think I should list it as for identification purposes on 'Bug Guide'?

 
I would hope an insect has but one scientific name worldwide.
But sometimes hope is not enough. Some of the Bug Guide categories are unique, in that one might be labeled "Flies for review by Dr. Whozit". Ken has moved your post to such a place.

(There have been different syrphid genus names, here and in Europe, but I think they are few and far between these days. BTW, I am not an expert.)

Lejops sp.
Subgenus Anasimyia

I'm going to say that's a Syr
I'm going to say that's a Syrphidae and someone who knows more than me can hopefully tell you more :-)

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.