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Photo#78123
Antennae - Anthrax georgicus

Antennae - Anthrax georgicus
Haw River at Bynum, Chatham County, North Carolina, USA
September 17, 2006
Size: 22 mm length
Detail of antennae, which I believe would be classified as stylate. See comments below on identification.
Update to this image 2/24/2020. Replaced with an adjacent frame and enlarged to 200 percent. Arrow indicates what may be the terminal tuft of hairs characteristic of Anthrax. See comments below on other characters.
near: 35.772676, -79.143062

Images of this individual: tag all
Anthrax georgicus Detail of wing - Anthrax georgicus Lateral view - Anthrax georgicus Face - Anthrax georgicus Antennae - Anthrax georgicus Detail of area between wing and halter - Anthrax georgicus

Moved
Moved from Hemipenthes.

Anthrax
This is actually an Anthrax species, specifically A. georgicus (often called A. analis). The hairs on the antenna of this species are very small, and can be difficult to see even under a microscope. A much easier character to separate Anthrax from Hemipenthes is to look at the side of the thorax between the wing base and the halter - this area is bare in Anthrax and covered with hair in Hemipenthes (you can see this, somewhat, in the dorsal shot in this series).

The wing patterns of A. georgicus and Hemipenthes morio are almost identical, although H. morio has lighter spots along the wing crossveins. H. morio also has brownish hairs on the body, while A. georgicus is entirely black (anthrax is the Greek word for coal). A. georgicus is one of the most widespread bombyliids in North America, occurring from the NWT south to Nicaragua, and along both coasts.

 
additional image!
I was going over old images and found this in my files:



Quoting the comment above: "A much easier character to separate Anthrax from Hemipenthes is to look at the side of the thorax between the wing base and the halter - this area is bare in Anthrax and covered with hair in Hemipenthes"
Seems to be shown in this image, as are a couple of other characters indicating Anthrax and A. georgicus in particular.

 
Thanks, other Anthrax?
Thanks for the correction, Joel. I'll check my other photographs of this individual and see if one of them shows that hairless area on the thorax.

Have you had any chance to look at our unidentified Anthrax here? In particular, these two:

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