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Photo#788389
Beetle from a Rotting Tree - Bolitotherus cornutus - male

Beetle from a Rotting Tree - Bolitotherus cornutus - Male
Morgan Hill State Forest, Cortland County, New York, USA
June 17, 2013
Size: 12mm
I found four of these tucked into the debris at the base of some woody bracket fungi on an old snag. When disturbed, they just tuck in and play dead. I had to wait hours for this guy to grip the leaf he was photographed on. How to get it to lift its head and extent the antlers, I can't figure out. They only move when I'm not looking. Maybe they aren't entirely healthy.

Images of this individual: tag all
Beetle from a Rotting Tree - Bolitotherus cornutus - male Beetle from a Rotting Tree - Bolitotherus cornutus Beetle from a Rotting Tree - Bolitotherus cornutus

perfectly healthy; they sit for hours or days w/o moving
nice series! the 'antlers' are rigid outgrowth of the exoskeleton; their shape and position cannot be changed.
the beast is very common in hard polypores.
Moved from ID Request.

 
Antlers
I'm glad they are healthy.

I can see his antlers tucked in under his head, but he won't stick them out for a better picture. Other pictures in the guide show antlers, so I'm jealous.

I've got one female in there and at night when I'm not looking, the males go over to her. I find them clinging to her back in the morning, head to tail. I wonder about the practicality of that.

 
confused... what part do you call 'antlers'?

 
Below his eyes
I mean his antennae. My bad.

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