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Photo#79816
wierd looking wasp/fly - Monoceromyia floridensis - female

wierd looking wasp/fly - Monoceromyia floridensis - Female
Plantation, Fort Lauderdale County, Florida, USA
Okay.. I thought the guide might be interested in this, I am not sure what this is so an ID would be nice. I was playing around with a reverse 24mm setup on my camera and saw what I thought was a wasp laying eggs into the bark of a tree, so I figured I would get up close and find out, when I got back inside and looked at the photos on my monitor I noticed that it really didn't look like a wasp and I couldn't figure out what it was, the antanae are what really throws me off. Any clues?

Charles

Images of this individual: tag all
wierd looking wasp/fly - Monoceromyia floridensis - female wierd looking wasp/fly - Monoceromyia floridensis wierd looking wasp/fly - Monoceromyia floridensis wierd looking wasp/fly - Monoceromyia floridensis - female

Moved
Moved from Ceriana.

Syrphid, genus Ceriana
It's a syrphid allright, but indeed not an obvious one. It belongs to the genus Ceriana (subfamily Eristalinae, tribe Ceriini).
There is a picture is the guide, but I suspect this one to be another species. Which one, I can't tell from a picture!
Greetings,

 
My Favorite
This image has my favorite insect antennae of all time.

Thick-headed Fly?
I'm not used to looking at bugs piecemeal, but I think you found a thick-headed fly. Compare with .

 
Good guess.
Good guess, but I don't see a beak on this specimen, which would tend to discount the conopids. I suspect it is either a syrphid, soldier fly, or mydas fly. Without seeing wing venation, and, ideally, the whole insect at once, I can't reach a conclusion either.

 
sorry Eric
I am sorry I couldn't get a shot of the whole specimen, I was out playing around with my reverse lens setup and there is only one focusing distance and that is at almost 3x!!
Thanks for the help though!

Charles

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