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Species Telmatogeton japonicus

Fly on Rock at Rocky  Saltwater Beach - Telmatogeton japonicus Fly on Rock at Rocky  Saltwater Beach - Telmatogeton japonicus Fly on Rock at Rocky  Saltwater Beach - Telmatogeton japonicus Telmatogeton japonicus Fly with long legs climbing up the cliff, falls but continues on - Telmatogeton japonicus Fly with long legs climbing up the cliff, falls but continues on - Telmatogeton japonicus Fly on seaweed - Telmatogeton japonicus Midge Maybe? - Telmatogeton japonicus - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon ("Nematocera" (Non-Brachycera))
Infraorder Culicomorpha (Mosquitoes and Midges)
Family Chironomidae (Non-biting Midges)
Subfamily Telmatogetoninae
Genus Telmatogeton
Species japonicus (Telmatogeton japonicus)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Telmatogeton japonicus Tokunaga, 1933
Size
Wing length about 3 mm
Range
Native to the western Pacific, now widespread. Reached eastern North America and Europe in the mid-20th century.
Habitat
Hard surfaces along marine shores. Larvae will also attach to buoys and aquatic structures, even in the open ocean. They may have reached the Atlantic by attaching to ship hulls.
Print References
Brodin, Y. and M. H. Andersson. 2009. The marine splash midge Telmatogon japonicus (Diptera; Chironomidae)—extreme and alien? Biological Invasions 11(6):1311-1317. (Abstract via Springer)