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Photo#803968
Unknown Beetle - Agrilus politus

Unknown Beetle - Agrilus politus
Creighton, Northern, Saskatchewan, Canada
July 13, 2013
Size: ~7mm
Found on a leaf...beautiful colors

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Beetle - Agrilus politus Unknown Beetle - Agrilus politus Unknown Beetle - Agrilus politus

Moved
Moved from Bronze Birch Borer.

Moved

Kind of Leaf?
-

 
I can narrow
it down to Willow, Poplar and possibly Alder...sorry

 
Species Complex
It is likely one of the species in the Agrilus anxius complex. There are species on all those plants. I just wonder of birch wouldn't be another possibility in that ecosystem, which would make the species anxius itself a possibility. The coloration seems most like the latter, but it has been many years since I worked on those critters, and my memory might be a little shaky.

 
Birch
I checked the area again and there is Birch there also.

 
-
Except for the fact that I can't see the tip of the pygidial spine, which is barely visible in this photo of a Agrilus anxius found on a dead birch, the overall resemblance seems pretty good to me:

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