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Genus Epipompilus

Epipompilus aztecus Epipompilus aztecus Epipompilus aztecus ? - Epipompilus aztecus Epipompilus aztecus ? - Epipompilus aztecus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon (Aculeata - Ants, Bees and Stinging Wasps)
Superfamily Pompiloidea (Spider Wasps, Velvet Ants and allies)
Family Pompilidae (Spider Wasps)
Subfamily Pepsinae
Tribe Pepsini
Genus Epipompilus
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Formerly placed in the tribe Aporini, with fairly good reason. Evans stated in his 1966 revision that the male genitalia (in those that are known) are very similar to Aporus. However, Pitts et al. (2006) presented evidence that the genus is better placed in the subfamily Ctenocerinae. Genetic studies have shown close relationships in Pepsini, namely Minagenia.
Numbers
Two species:
Epipompilus pulcherrimus
Size
4-14 mm
Identification
Color black or black and reddish or orange. Abdomen often with white markings. Legs black or black and reddish or orange. Anterior wing with three submarginal cells. Other venation of the anterior wing generally unremarkable. Venation of posterior wings rather "primitive", the anal vein often slightly extended beyond the junction of the transverse median vein; the latter forming a strong angle with the anal vein, nearly straight, oblique, reaching the median vein much basad of the origin of the cubitus. Eyes of American species setose. Maxillary palpi unusually long. Pronotum fairly long, but not as long as in the Aporini. Front femora slightly to moderately incrassate.
Range
Mainly found in the neotropics with instrusions into the Nearctic region (E. pulcherrimus in FL, E. aztecus in TX). Also known from Australia and New Zealand.
Food
Not known to visit flowers. Prey families for North American species are unknown.
Print References
Bradley, J. C. 1944. A preliminary revision of the Pompilinae (exclusive of the tribe Pompilini) of the Americas (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae). The American Entomological Society, Transactions. 70:23-157,4 pl.

Evans, H. 1966. A revision of the Mexican and central American spider wasps of the subfamily Pompilinae (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae). The American Entomological Society, Memoirs:1-442, 11 pl.

Pitts, J.P., M.S. Wasbauer and C.D. von Dohlen. 2006. Preliminary morphological analysis of relationships between the spider wasp subfamilies (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae): revisiting an old problem. Zoologica Scripta, 35: 63–84
Internet References
Silvestre, Rogerio, Tiago Henrique Auko, Vander Carbonari. Insecta, Hymenoptera, Vespoidea, Pompilidae Epipompilus aztecus (Cresson, 1869): First Record in South America. www.checklist.org.br/getpdf?NGD079-09.