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Photo#810322
Unidentified Colorado Cicada - Megatibicen dealbatus

Unidentified Colorado Cicada - Megatibicen dealbatus
Sterling, CO, Logan County, Colorado, USA
July 23, 2013
Size: Two Inches
Twenty-seven species are said to be in Colorado but none of the pictures on any site match this one.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unidentified Colorado Cicada - Megatibicen dealbatus Unidentified Colorado Cicada - Megatibicen dealbatus

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Tibicen auletes?
All that white dust (pruinosus) on it reminds me of a Tibicen auletes, but the markings are a little different from what I'm used to seeing here in Missouri. Is the measurement you gave with or without the wings?

 
T. dealbatus?
...the coloration is similar to that of a Tibicen dealbatus with pruinosity...though I'm not sure if they are found that far out ino Colorado.

 
Yup
Yup, I think you pegged it.

The markings on the face are exactly like a T. dealbatus, and I just checked and discovered that T. dealbatus does indeed extend up into Colorado.

 
Awesome
T. dealbatus is quite similar to T. pronotalis but with more pruinosity, which gave me an inkling that it maybe a dealbatus.

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