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Photo#819083
Apolysis on Ivesia santolinoides - Apolysis - male - female

Apolysis on Ivesia santolinoides - Apolysis - Male Female
Mt Pinos, Ventura County, California, USA
August 2, 2013
The male (right) and female (left) here were two of many Apolysis that were visiting the flowers of Ivesia santolinoides (Rosaceae) in the alpine fell-fields at ~8800' atop Mt. Pinos.

Beyond the small size, long proboscis, and general gestalt here...the blunt antennae and three posterior cells are among the characters pointing to Apolysis.

Images of this individual: tag all
Apolysis on Ivesia santolinoides - Apolysis - male - female Apolysis on Ivesia santolinoides - Apolysis - female Apolysis on Ivesia santolinoides - Apolysis - male

Another nice series, Aaron.
This is an exceptionally good shot.

 
Thanks, Ron.
Glad you enjoyed it...actually, the plant is one of my favorites. It has amazingly densely-packed small, hairy, leaflets...which, as a unit, make each leaf look like a mouse-tail (a common name for the plant). It also grows in beautiful alpine habitats, which helps to associate it with exalted states of being :-)

   

 
Quite nice.
I'm starting to become more interested in plants, but am just taking baby steps for now. Desert chicory was a recent discovery, which I like for the diversity of insects it attracts.

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