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Photo#82860
Rain Beetle - Pleocoma - male

Rain Beetle - Pleocoma - Male
Lorane: 18 miles southwest of Eugene, Lane County, Oregon, USA
Size: about an inch long
I think this is a male Pleocoma hirticollis. It is reddish-brown, not black.

Pleocoma simi/carinata group (possibly)
Definitely not P. hirticollis sp. nor are the "unlinked" photos. Dorsal coloration isn't indicative. Need a better photo. The diagnostic morphological characters of the head and lamellae are in shadow.

The field guide mentioned isn't a field guide but more of a general California coleoptera highlights compilation with a brief review of selected taxa.

Pleocoma for sure
IDs are often possible based solely on range, since the females are flightless - and MUCH larger. Ever see the females? Moved to genus page - will have to dig up some lit, to go further - you're probably right though.

 
insect guides
Thank you Phillip. No, I haven't seen the females. Is it possible to find them? I have five insect books and it's still hard to find information on local insects. What guide would you recommend? I'm a masters of ed. student at Pacific University and will teach science next year. These insects are part of an assignment, and I'm building up material to use in class. One of my tech. class assignments is a photo gallery on a blog. I'm doing insects (obviously) and used Comic Life to make a Rain Beetle guide, besides posting other insects. I'd love your comments if you have any: http://www.sherrysputechclass.blogspot.com

I'm going to post the wasp here next; it's on my blog. I know I should collect one and kill it to look at the wings, but I'm feeling a little too kind-hearted to do it.

 
re
Females are possible to find, but would almost certainly require some digging. Finding the burrows is probably not easy. I'm afraid I'm not familiar enough with guides available for your area, Eric Eaton is probably a better person to ask about that. Art Evans has a fieldguide to the California Beetles coming out soon - I'm sure that will be excellent. Your blog is nicely done - good luck.

 
newer specimen
The rain beetles have begun their mating flights. I have a couple of pictures of the same species that are a little better than this one. Would you like them?

 
Unlinked
For reference, these are the other pictures:



also:

 
sure
under represented group - more the merrier. I've only dug up one female - in CA, from a road cut. Just a smallish round hole in the bank on side of the road - similar situation in Oregan? The hole looked way too small for the beetle and the ground appeared too hard for a beetle to dig in - had to use a rock pick. Still don't know how they manage it.

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