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Photo#83594
What in the world? - Megarhyssa macrurus

What in the world? - Megarhyssa macrurus
Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, USA
October 14, 2006
Size: body-2", total-5"
found on a dead elm tree with 2 very long "feelers" buried into the wood about 2 inches deep. Very carefully pulled and prodded and got the creature loose and took these pictures.

Moved
Moved from Orange and Brown.

I would say
it looks like an Ichneumon wasp.. but they vary sooooo much its hard to tell, I am sure the experts will chime in with the correct genus.. now species that is another story, but I could be wrong.

Charles

 
I agree with Charles
I agree with Charles, and I too will defer to others on the genus.

A number of Ichneumons have these huge long ovipositors that can be used, for example, to lay eggs deep in an old stump or log.

 
Must be Megarhyssa
That large, I think it has to be a Megarhyssa--compare Stephen's photograph:

 
Ha
Ha! I knew I had photographed one of these but I had forgotten that I had IDed it, thanks to other BugGuide photos of the genus.

 
Absolutely.
Definitely a species of Megarhyssa, and a female of course.

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