Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

BugGuide is a National Moth Week Partner. How to add your National Moth Week 2021 photos. July 17-25.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#836578
Bombus sp female on Senecio - Bombus occidentalis - female

Bombus sp female on Senecio - Bombus occidentalis - Female
Brainard Lake Recreational Area, Boulder County, Colorado, USA
July 30, 2013
Size: BL ~ 17 mm
This Bombus female is collecting pollen from Senecio, probably Senecio crassulus, at Red Rock Lake, elevation ~ 10,300'. The pattern and white tail suggest B. occidentalis? I will also post two other views.

Images of this individual: tag all
Bombus sp female on Senecio - Bombus occidentalis - female Bombus sp female on Senecio - Bombus occidentalis - female Bombus sp female on Senecio - Bombus occidentalis - female

Moved

 
Bombus occidentalis female
Thanks so much for this positive ID, Dr. Ascher. It is much appreciated!

Moved
Moved from Bumble Bees.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Thanks!
Thanks, James, for moving to Bombus.

 
No problem Lynn!
As always, I enjoy your photos!

I agree with B. occidentalis
Dark head, yellow front of the thorax, yellow T3, black T4, and white T5 seems like a good match for a female Western Bumble Bee to me. They have disappeared from much of their historic range, but they seem to be hanging on in Colorado.

 
Bombus occidentalis in Colorado
This year at least they were doing quite well. We have seen several that seem like this species at many elevations, though this is the first female with pollen.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.