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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinks
Books
Data

Species Hippodamia convergens - Convergent Lady Beetle

 
 
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Reproductive diapause in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and its life history consequences
By Michaud, J.P. & Qureshi, J.A.
Biological Control 39(2), 193-200, 2006

Review of the New World Species of Hippodamia Dejean (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
By Edward A. Chapin
Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collection, vol. 106 no. 11, 1946
With 246 figures, this 1946 publication is still the visual reference for North American Hippodamia. (Gordon(1) and American Beetles both refer the reader to it for more comprehensive illustrations than their publications provide.) A wide range of dorsal patterns for each species is illustrated, along with the male genitalia.

Range maps are limited in scope, but accurately depict type localities. Species names match modern taxonomy, but subspecies are outdated. The non-native species H. variegata is not included because it was not yet introduced.

Errata:

The Coccinellidae (Ladybird Beetles) of Minnesota
By Stehr, W.C. 1930.
Univ. Minn. Agr. Expt. Sta., St.Paul, 1930
Stehr, W.C. 1930. The Coccinellidae (Ladybird Beetles) of Minnesota. Univ. Minn. Agr. Expt. Sta. Tech. Bull. 75. 54 pp.

An annotated and updated species list of the Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) of South Dakota
By Hesler L.S., Kieckhefer R.W.
Col. Bull. 62: 443-454, 2008

A list of the lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of North Dakota with new records from North Dakota and Minnesota
By Fauske G.M., Tinerella P.P., Rider D.A.
J. Kans. Ent. Soc. 76: 38-46, 2003

Key to lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of Saskatchewan
By Larson D.J.
Ent. Soc. Saskatchewan. 37 pp., 2013

Natural enemies of the Coccinellidae: parasites, pathogens, and parasitoids.
By Riddick, E.W., T.E. Cottrell, and K.A. Kidd.
Biological Control 51: 306–312., 2009
Full PDF

Riddick, E.W., T.E. Cottrell, and K.A. Kidd. 2009. Natural enemies of the Coccinellidae: parasites, pathogens, and parasitoids. Biological Control 51(2): 306–312.

Abstract
We review aspects of the life histories of representative enemies of coccinellids (both entomophagous and phytophagous species) and expose both potential and real effects that they have on life parameters of their hosts. Lady beetles are attacked by a variety of natural enemies (bacteria, fungi, mites, nematodes, protozoa, wasps, flies). Few of these enemies have the ability to alter significantly the population dynamics of their hosts. This review should encourage further research to help define the role of natural enemies in the population dynamics of coccinellids. Ultimately, the conservation of beneficial lady beetles and the management of nuisance and pestiferous ones should be major emphases of research on coccinellid–natural enemy interactions.

Lady beetles as predators of insects other than Hemiptera.
By Evans, E.W.
Biological Control 51: 255-267., 2009
Full PDF

Evans, E.W. 2009. Lady beetles as predators of insects other than Hemiptera. Biological Control 51: 255-267.

(Or: Evans, E.W. Lady beetles as predators of insects other than Hemiptera. Biological Control (2009), doi:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2009.05.011)

Abstract:

Entomophagous lady beetles often prey on a variety of insects in addition to the Hemiptera (Sternorrhyncha) for which they are well-known natural enemies. Many species (particularly those well-adapted for consuming aphids) appear opportunistic in their use of non-hemipteran prey.

 
 
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