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Photo#83745
Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti - female

Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti - Female
Ascension Parish, Louisiana, USA
October 17, 2006
Size: Less than 3mm
I found another specimen and have posted a few more images that may help identify the insect.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti - female Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti - female Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti - female Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti Tiny Fly - Stilobezzia coquilletti

Moved
Moved from Stilobezzia. Keyed using Wirth 1953 (see genus page).

Biting midge?
This is a superb image, Perry, thanks for sharing! I wonder if this is an engorged (abdomen is distended, and the pattern is actally the abdominal plates separated) biting midge in the family Ceratopogonidae. Hoping a real fly expert will chime in now:-)

 
...
The wing venation looks right for a Ceratopogonid. I am not that familiar with this family however.
The abdomen lookd as though this is a gravid female.

 
Punkies
Looking at my notes on this family, I see these traits: wings often broad (that matches); antennae 8-16 segmented (looks right); the eyes don't meet (I suppose that is ok, though these almost meet); thickened part of the costa makes it 1/2 to 3/4 of the way to the wingtip (looks good). The only thing that doesn't seem to match is "wings typically held one over the other when at rest," but this could be an atypical species, or maybe it was stretching or grooming or preparing to take flight.

This is one good-looking fly and now I want to find one too!

 
Ceratopogonidae
Definitely a female biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). The pictures are so good, that I keyed it out to the genus Stilobezzia. Excellent pics!

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