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Photo#847332
Is this Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis? - Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis - female

Is this Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis? - Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis - Female
Long Beach, Los Angeles County, California, USA
September 25, 2013
Size: 2-3mm
Compare to Mike Rose's female photo on Dr. Noyes's chalcid database here.

California is listed under its distribution... assuming its native to Australia though, probably introduced as a biological control (for mealybugs?)

EDIT: I've found more info on this species by searching its previous name (Anarhopus sydneyensis). This article is most relevant. To summarize: this species was introduced into Southern California in 1933 to control an outbreak of the Long-tailed Mealybug Pseudococcus longispinus

Images of this individual: tag all
Is this Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis? - Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis - female Is this Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis? - Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis - female

splendid --thanks all!
Moved from Encyrtids.

Confirmation
Per Dr. John Noyes, encyrtid specialist in London and author of the Universal Chalcidoidea Database, this certainly looks like Tetracnemoidea sydneyensis.

Nice find/photo, Chris.
.

spectacular beast...
i had to crop it to make more detail available to those experts who don't have a BG account

Moved from "Parasitica" (parasitic Apocrita).

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