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Family Pyrrhocoridae - Red Bugs

Nymph of Cotton Stainer? - Dysdercus suturellus Cotton Stainer - Dysdercus mimulus plant bug? - Dysdercus suturellus Cotton Stainers - Dysdercus andreae - male - female Scantius aegyptius Pyrrhocoris apterus? - Pyrrhocoris apterus - male - female Request ID - Dysdercus suturellus - male - female Dysdercus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Heteroptera (True Bugs)
Infraorder Pentatomomorpha
Superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea
Family Pyrrhocoridae (Red Bugs)
Other Common Names
Stainers
Numbers
10 spp. in 3 genera in our area (incl. two recently introduced w. Palaearctic spp.)(1), >400 spp. in ~65 genera worldwide(2) OR 340 spp. in ~33 genera worldwide(3)
Size
8-18 mm(1), up to 30 mm elsewhere(2)
Identification
resemble some members of Lygaeidae, but lack ocelli and have more veins in the forewing membrane; most are colored black and red(4)
Range
worldwide, most diverse in the tropics and subtropics, with only a few species in the temperate regions(2); in our area, more common in the south(1)
Habitat
most spp. are found on low plants; a few Old World spp. are ground-dwelling and thought to feed on fallen mature seeds(2)
Food
primarily granivorous or fructivorous(2)
Remarks
Works Cited
1.American Insects: A Handbook of the Insects of America North of Mexico
Ross H. Arnett. 2000. CRC Press.
2.Zoological catalogue of Australia: Hemiptera: Heteroptera (Pentatomomorpha)
Cassis G., Gross G.F. 2002. CSIRO Publishing, 751 pp.
3.Biodiversity of the Heteroptera
Henry T.J. 2009. In: Foottit R.G., Adler P.H., eds. Insect biodiversity: Science and society. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell: 223-263.
4.A Field Guide to Insects
Richard E. White, Donald J. Borror, Roger Tory Peterson. 1998. Houghton Mifflin Co.