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Photo#849691
Twilight Darner or Cuban Darner? - Tricanthagyna trifida - female

Twilight Darner or Cuban Darner? - Tricanthagyna trifida - Female
NE Ft. Myers / Caloosahatchee Creeks Preserve East, Lee County, Florida, USA
September 29, 2013
Size: 3 inches
From Paulson's book, I took this to be a Twilight Darner [Gynacantha nervosa] but from Dunkle's book I questioned if this could be a Cuban Darner [Gynacantha ereagris] based on the narrower abdomen section or "waist". So either it's a female Cuban Darner or a male Twilight Darner? Any help? I've tried my best on my own and never ID'd this dragonfly before ~ your comments will be most appreciated!

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Twilight Darner or Cuban Darner? - Tricanthagyna trifida - female Twilight Darner or Cuban Darner? - Tricanthagyna trifida - female

Moved
Moved from Dragonflies.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Nancy, did you consider femal
Nancy, did you consider female Phantom Darner (Tricanthagyna trifida)? I think with the dorsal stripe on the thorax, the constricted "waist" and the very long cerci, that is probably the best fit.

 
Good point!
Sorry for taking so long to respond ... and, until your suggestion, I had not considered female Phantom Darner since the odd lighting at first made me think the thorax didn't have any stripes or markings, but I've looked again & now I can see how you're right! On the same day, same preserve, I had photographed a male Phantom Darner; didn't have my guide handy, so I didn't relate them since they were very different, plus thought maybe I'd find 2 new-to-me Darners in one day, but not so. I very much appreciate your time & input!

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